A Mixed Bag

This week was a round-up of the odd requests that meander through the regular collections of pants and jackets and brides.

You remember the jacket from last week and the replacement zipper? Well when the man came to get his jacket he dropped off something precious/ready for charity store  for me to repair. It seems there are a lot of men who in their 60′s like to attend pep rallies at their old high school and this t-shirt was one of those rank “Alumni” shirts that are worn to prove that you actually graduated and can still stretch vintage cotton knit to its maximum. But something went wrong.

It seems Mr. Alumni stretched his precious shirt over the head of a mascot stuffed animal and to get it to fit he had to rip the shoulder seam wide open…doesn’t everyone? Then he thought he could drop it off and have it fixed like new in time for the big game on the weekend. I did the best I could with this raggedy dilemma inside and out:

He can now wear his shirt with pride and spill popcorn and beer all over it and shout until he loses his voice and know that he won’t be exposing his he-man chest to his fellow revelers.

 

 

Some of you have asked about those disastrous white chiffon pants that had been butchered by the dry cleaners. Well they did turn out very well with a neat hand rolled hem and machine hemmed lining with what was left to be salvaged. No one will ever know what bad shape they were in from the beginning now will they?

Have you ever been asked to line one of those Made in India rayon floaty tops because it was too sheer? Well that was a challenge, well more of a challenge just to find the right lining that would drape the same as the wispy rayon and not change the “hand” or be too opaque. My client was sent out to JoAnn’s to find plain old cotton batiste which is just about the lightest they carry. Well, the poor girl got dragged around the store and told that all they carry now is something called “Tulip” and it is half polyester…great. She bought it anyway and left it with me to pre-shrink etc and even after washing and drying on hot, it was still too crispy so I dug through my stash from Farmhouse Fabrics and found a cotton voile that worked very well. Here are the photos, please click on the thumbnails:

 

Yes, the new  custom lining was all cut slowly by hand and inserted by hand using a cotton embroidery thread, while at least the side seams and hems could be sewn by machine. Some women refuse to wear bras and this is the solution although I think the labor will rival the actual initial cost of the top but remember that I live near a town that harbors women who wear only “organic” fabrics.

To finish up the week one of my very classy clients brought me a silk scarf that had a black center section bordered by lovely shade of blue and she asked if I could remove the center section. First I measured and pinned the part that was going to be removed:

Stitch wrong sides together. Then trim off the excess and leave 1/8 inch for turning into the French seam. Press flat and flip to the right side to encase the raw edges along with my favorite glass head pins to hold it tight.

And the result is: The remaining black section was roll hemmed on my serger with black thread for a mini scarf to wear with different outfits. It is always a bonus to be able to re-use unwanted parts of accessories for the clients.

Here’s hoping you only have small challenges this week!

 

 

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One Response to A Mixed Bag

  1. Alethia says:

    You have been quite busy with the tedious stuff~ hand sew the lining in place,uh!
    HS reunion/homecoming is on the horizon for me, not sure if I want to go. That very same thing ~ that much dedication to your alma mater is creepy to me, that’s just me. Grown men that uptight….wow?!?!??!

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