K is for Kimono

My client Nancy and I exchange cute Christmas gifts every year. This Fall she gave me this fabric to make into her usual sheer drapey jackets. Having 2.5 yards of fabric was just enough to make into this new pattern and surprise her with free labor and a new statement jacket.

I just finished the most fun pattern I have ever used!!!

Maybe I feel this way after cranking out hundreds of wedding gowns with tulle and lace layers but this can be made in a day!

Here is the link to the Kimono jacket.

Four basic pattern pieces, a front and a back and a skirt can be sewn with any seam treatment and any neckline/front binding. I chose open seams on the shoulders and side and center back seams but used French seams when attaching the skirt to the bodice as they are stronger.

The only alteration I made was to do the rounded back slash and allow the top back seam to curve as it was not cut on the fold.

Below are two photos of each pose showing you the seaming that is not apparent with this jungle print.

This pattern is so much more flattering than flat Kimono patterns that hang and slide off the shoulders and have no place to attach a snap at the waist and thus need a lame looking belt. This pattern adds volume and flare where she needs it, over her tummy and hips while making her waist a feature…so flattering!

The red line shows the front seam:

Red line shows the back seam:

The pattern calls for attaching stiff store bought bias trim to the front edges but as this was Marcus Bros polyester chiffon, I just managed to cut my own bias strips from leftover fabric. I folded the 1.5 inch wide strips in half, basted them to the wrong side and then machine stitched them down on the right side so they can be seen. As this was an all-over print, I needed to have something to give the eye a rest and not look homemade.

Before flipping the folded edge to the right side, excess is trimmed away.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The bias binding is pinned to the right side and stitched down.

The best part, putting a snap on the binding edge so it stays closed and flat and no slipping off her shoulders:

Excitement time in the sewing room!!!

This week I received my label order from the Dutch Label Shop.

In the past, I have ordered stiff printed ones from other companies but after many washings, the printing disappears. These soft labels are all woven and the choice of colors, lines and fonts is amazing! Nancy has her own labels and I also ordered some for all the charity sewing we do in the ASG. My 94 yr. old mother is to the point of claiming that people are losing her clothes so she has her own labels with her apt number in assisted living.

 

 

With Christmas coming, here is a great gift for Mom from the 1950’s.

It made me laugh seeing this comment left by a gentleman:

What a great Christmas gift – where can I get one? My wife has to bend over, wring the mop – she works so hard cleaning the house – I’d like to make it easier on her – it would be so nice for me not to have to worry about her while I’m golfing with the boys.

Maybe some of you remember such buckets or still use them, after all, the ad says it is built to last a lifetime!!!

Wishing you all a little more time to finish sewing those last minute gifts!!!

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17 Responses to K is for Kimono

  1. shoes15 says:

    Yeah… I need that mop…
    I agree about the Dutch Label Shop – I got some excellent labels from them last year.

  2. Kim says:

    I’m sure Nancy will love that top!
    With regards getting a mop bucket as a gift – I would be giving it right back (with the instructions for how to use it while I’m out playing 😎).

  3. Nice to hear a review of that pattern. I saw it made up in a quilt shop a few months ago and had to go buy it, haven’t made it yet.

  4. erniek3 says:

    Wait a minute: she gives you fabric to make her stuff with? Are we sure her name isn’t Sandi and she’s my sister? The pattern is fine, but that fabric is aMAZing. I didn’t realize how pervasive animal prints were until yesterday and a trip to the shopping mall. Dang.
    I have used mop buckets like that, but not as good, and I would take one. I hate foam squeezable mops.

  5. mrsmole says:

    Nancy travels and brings back fabrics all the time for new outfits. As time permits, I make them up and I certainly enjoy getting away from the white alligators in my room! It is amazing that mid-priced poly chiffon can be such a hit. Great for traveling too. Nancy is the closet thing I have to a sister. Hope Santa checks your list and leaves a mop bucket for you!!!

  6. maryfunt says:

    Lovely gift. I’m sure she appreciates your work. Mop bucket ad is too funny.I too would tell my husband to read the directions before he uses it; I’ll be on the golf course. Happy Holidays.

  7. Catherine P says:

    Beautiful jacket! Fabric is so fabulous! Have this pattern and love it, too.

  8. Katrina B says:

    What a relief to have an uncomplicated project for once with such pleasing results! I can see that having the snap in the front would make all the difference in this type of jacket.

    That’s a pretty cool mop bucket but I think Mrs. Golf will still have to bend over to pick the thing up and lug it around the house. Nice try, Mr. Golf! I have a janitor’s wringer bucket on wheels (and yes my husband uses it!) – a bit more convenient for moving around but the wringer mechanism is a hand lever rather than a foot pedal. They need to combine technologies for the ultimate bucket. And then it should come with a warning label: this bucket is not to be given as a Mother’s Day, birthday, or other holiday gift!

    • mrsmole says:

      Mops/buckets don’t belong on anyone’s wish list! But technology is slowly coming around to maybe one day we will have it perfected and a robot will be doing the mopping.

  9. wendyww says:

    I have this pattern. I made it with a plaid flannel and love the results! I’ve lost a considerable amount of weight and need to cut it down a couple sizes but that’s a daunting task when perfectly matched plaid seams are involved.

  10. mrsmole says:

    Wow, Wendy, that skirt must be nice to look at with its curves in plaid!

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