Bling and Swing(ing) 60’s

Lots of donated fabrics find their way to my house and into the ASG Community Sew pile during the year. Some folks just drop off fabrics for me to recycle into something usable.

When this fabric was dropped off, I was impressed but didn’t know what it could be transformed into. While the opposite selvedges were brown or hot pink,  both edges were impregnated with gold glue to resemble sequins…it took some thought and pattern planning.

Shiny glue did not photograph well!!!!

I settled on Simplicity 8172 which I had used before for Nancy. This pattern fits so well and drapes so nicely and even through the sleeves are “cut on” they are close to the body without adding bulk under the arms like most boxy kimono shapes.

I chose View D.The photos are fuzzy but you can see the main part of the kimono had no gold glue dots. The flounce was cut like a circle skirt so I opted to keep the straight of grain gold dots for the down center front. The sleeves also made use of the selvedges with narrow hems.

Instead of a button or snap, Nancy wanted a narrow tie.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A better front view with the tie and all edges sewn with a narrow hem in the chiffon.

The back view showing how the lower flounce runs crossgrain and has a center back seam.

It gives Nancy a little blingy jacket to wear when she is feeling a little jazzy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In another donation bag of fabric scraps, I found this brocade jacket from the 60’s. It was made in London on Carnaby Street and it may look familar for those as old as I am. It was quite fashionable back them and despite the hems being undone and the side seams being taken in badly, I was able to release the previous alterations and press it nice and flat. It has a metal zipper and the stitching looks like the original but being grey, it looks awkward.

The back resembles the front with princess seams.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The original label:

About the designer:

Aristos Constantinou graduated from the London School of Fashion in 1965. His father was a master tailor located at 45 Carnaby Street and gave Aristos two rooms on the first floor of his shop. His brother Achilleas was still in school and had hippie friends who painted the doorway in psychedelic colors, attracting a young and eager clientele. The shop was an instant success right in the heart of the British mod fashion revolution. Because of his couture training, Aristos was able to offer avant garde designs and was the first British designer to offer couture on high street.

   

It was a real peacock time for fashion especially for the men in music. Whether it be Mick Jagger in a checked suit or the Beatles in psychedelic trappings, it was a time to indulge and be seen!

The 60’s were my favorite time as that is when I first got a letter from my new British penpal from Liverpool in 1964. We swapped 45’s and magazine cuttings from the time but we never knew that 30 years later we would be happliy married!

 

Just 9 days until Thanksgiving here in the US and we all know what that means…stuffing…and more stuffing the bird and ourselves with such delicious foods while trying not to get into an argument with relatives who are rarely seen or invited to our table until turkey day. Being grateful for all the things we have in life will make for a pleasant day! Thank you all for following my blog and commenting! Gooble Gooble!

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21 Responses to Bling and Swing(ing) 60’s

  1. JenL says:

    I really enjoyed this post! A happy Thanksgiving to you, Mrs. Mole, and your pen pal!

  2. Barbara Bachmann says:

    Hey there! I love this post! As you know I was a 60’s girl too. I love the part where Mr Mole was your pen pal! I think I will get thispattern for a piece of fabric I picked up at a yard sale. Thanks for the inspiration.

    • mrsmole says:

      Yes, Barb, this pattern can use up small amounts of fabric to turn them into something quite custom. Having a penpal 6,000 miles away was quite something when stamps were 3 cents. I still have one of our letters and the envelope.

  3. Nancy Figur says:

    Happy Thanksgiving from another 60’s girl!

  4. DONNA says:

    So clever Happy Thanksgiving

  5. upsew says:

    Happy thanksgiving, beautiful make from that fabric, the colours are beautiful and fabric suits the blouse style beautifully…..well wear

  6. Odette says:

    Another 60s gal appreciated this post!

  7. Fun post. Always great to see scraps & discards getting a new lease on life.

  8. raquel says:

    Wow! that jacket is such a treasure! If it could talk and tell us who was the original owner!

  9. mrsmole says:

    You bet! What concerts and parties has it been to? How did it get here 6,000 miles from London? How many times has it changed owners? All it needs is for the hem to be resewn and it can continue its life.

  10. I LOVELOVELOVE what you did with that first bit of fabric–so gorgeous. Enjoy the mystery and history of the Carnaby Street jacket too!

  11. Joan Vardanega says:

    Great pattern matching for Nancy’s new bling jacket! I am also amazed at your pen pal story. Who know what the future brings! Have a Happy Thanksgiving!

  12. Judy says:

    What a fantastic love story!!! Enjoyed seeing the creative layout for the beautiful sari fabric. Happy Thanksgiving to one and all!

  13. Happy you found use for that fancy fabric! I would love to have Carnaby Street jacket like yours. What a lovely thing! Happy thanksgiving!

  14. erniek3 says:

    Oh, what a sweet story! That Nancy is quite the style muse, too. Happy winter food holidays to one and all, but mostly Mr and Mrs Mole

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